Posted by PeaceThroughAnarchy on 25th May, 2021 @ 17:31 UTC

Let's be a little Punk-y (and Crossover-y) for a moment!




What's your fav Hardcore or Crossover songs/bands/albums that you find underrated?

13 Comments for 'Underrated Hardcore Punk / Crossover songs.'

‹‹ #1 ›› By HordalandImperator on 26th May, 2021 @ 11:41 UTC -
2%

Haven't been much into hardcore/crossover although I do remember these guys (Ofensiva) were short lived but dropped a killer album, underrated:

https://diasdejuventud.bandcamp.com/album/ofensiva-a-ltima-palavra

‹‹ #4 ›› By IranPeaceThroughAnarchy on 26th May, 2021 @ 13:26 UTC -

Damnnnnn! those Vocals are Insane! i've got to check the whole album!
Thanks for sharing.

‹‹ #2 ›› By HordalandImperator on 26th May, 2021 @ 11:48 UTC -
2%

And these guys are pretty big in Spain, varying degrees of crossover influence over their careers, but they are unknown abroad afaik:

‹‹ #5 ›› By IranPeaceThroughAnarchy on 26th May, 2021 @ 13:29 UTC -

I wasn't expecting to find Hardcore bands of this quality from Spain!

in our region Punk rock as a whole doesn't exist and the few existing bands from Turkey or Iran are extremely Generic and Unoriginal. i will definitely check the spanish Punk scene though.
thanks again!

‹‹ #6 ›› By HordalandImperator on 27th May, 2021 @ 22:45 UTC -

No worries man I'm afraid my arsenal of hardcore bands is pretty limited tho. Are the guys you posted above from Iran?

‹‹ #8 ›› By IranPeaceThroughAnarchy on 27th May, 2021 @ 23:26 UTC -

Me neither actually! i just wanted to help get the ball rolling with the forum.

No. The first two are from the States and the third one is from UK.

it's weird but even with internet and lots of progressions, Iranian Extreme music still doesn't really exist! (most people think its because of the strict rules and imprisonments and shit. but i believe it's because of the fact that our Punk/metal heritage and exposure in the 80s, 90s and even the 2000s was nearly zero!)

in short we don't have anything in extreme music and the reason the existing few acts suck, is the fact that they are conducted by some rich iranian kids living abroad. (and also because the ones living in iran are brainwashed with really shitty ideologies!)

‹‹ #10 ›› By HordalandImperator on 28th May, 2021 @ 00:31 UTC -
2%

Yeah indeed, having an actual heritage of sorts plays a big part in any region's metal scene, even if it's just an underground scene, like in South-East Asia these days for example.

I think it's also due to the fact that the momentum behind metal music in 80s and 90s was strongly linked to western "culture", this is what seemed to sow the roots of said heritage in most scenes, whichever place and year it eventually happened for each one. Like in Eastern Europe in the 90s, metal was an inherently western thing that propagated towards the east with the fall of the iron curtain, something which was definitely a cultural barrier prior to that. And now, with the advent of widespead internet as you say, the cultural barriers are increasingly weaker.

Do you think Iran *might* have had a chance at having an underground metal scene comparable to those of say Indonesia or Philippines if they had remained in the sphere of US oil-greedy influence? From 1979 onward a strong anti-western cultural barrier was erected there. It might not be as opaque these days, but it certainly was in the 80s and 90s, which were a crucial period for the development of this heritage for many metal scenes.

On the other hand, if we look at South Africa for example, it's unequivocally western, and has been for a long time, but their metal scene is relatively dead, as far as I know. So there is probably not a direct correlation, but rather several factors at play here. Also Korea and Japan, despite both receiving a heavy dose of western influence at around the same time, didn't seem to evolve the same way in terms of metal. Japan absolutely fucking loves metal (and jazz if I'm not mistaken), while Korea seems to have adopted western Pop more than anything.

There's also factors like, generational differences, and also what types of music were popular in each country in the 60s and 70s, laying the groundwork and directing the course for what could potentially happen musically in the decades that followed. Maybe metal wouldn't have taken off in Eastern Europe the way it did in the 90s if they didn't already have a solid underground rock scene in the 80s. Likewise, I have no idea really what Korea and Japan's music scenes were like in the 60s and 70s, perhaps they were vastly different.

Anyway, pretty much just thinking out loud at this point, it's an interestingly complex topic and it seems like something that books could be written about. But yeah, good to get the ball rolling, and I find Iran quite a fascinating country tbh.

‹‹ #11 ›› By IranPeaceThroughAnarchy on 28th May, 2021 @ 07:20 UTC -
2%

You've basically summed up the main points about our regions problems perfectly! i can't top this answer or add anything to it but i can agree with lots of points you've mentioned with some extra examples;

The anti-western cultural barrier that you mentioned is actually pretty strong even today. people have resentment towards western pop music too!

you are absolutley correct with the Africa analysis.there is no absolute explanation.

But i think the point about the importance of political events on culture is pretty plausible. (Especially when they happen at a very important year like 1979 or 1980!) and the best example for that would be our next door neighbour Turkey. They had a fantastic Psychedelic / Progressive scene since the mid 60s and even had some of the heaviest Hard Rock bands in the 70s but in 1980 there was a massive Military Coup there and they suddenly turned the country into total darkness for a couple of years. most of the psych/prog bands fled to germany and the music didn't evolve. unlike our revolution, that reign came to and after a year or two but the effect that had on people changed the culture for at least 30 years! the only notable underground scene there was the Hip-hop scene in the 2000s!

our music history is not that great but the 60s and 70s stuff from Turkey that i've listened are Deep Purple or even Black sabbath level of heavy! who knows what would have happened if the Coup didn't happen. maybe we would have had a NWOTHM in the 80s!

and there wasn't even any physical restriction in Turkey but thanks to the psy-opera of 1980 they didn't even notice the fact that Mayhem played a gig in Turkey in 1990! (With Pelle "Dead").

also, just like you, i don't have any explanation for Japan's musical revolution in the 80s! they are just too fucking awesome!

but overall i think mainly it's the internet's fault! yeah it opened a lot of gates but it also turned the art of rebellion with the art of seduction through trend-setting and manipulating!


anyway, like you said, this is a very complex issue and needs a massive argument with people from around the world who actually care about stuff like this! let's hope to see a day like that before we die!

‹‹ #12 ›› By HordalandImperator on 28th May, 2021 @ 10:53 UTC -
2%

That's true, about the internet and the art of rebellion. I don't think such rebellious, energetic things like punk & metal would have exploded exactly the way they did in the 80s if all the kids had been glued to their phones looking at facebook and twitter, everyone fully interconnected and sedated by corporate agendas as they often seem to be today.

I was born in the 80s and grew up in the 90s and definitely remember how the lack of internet meant a lack of awareness, and when you're not aware of something, you don't care about it either, you don't worry about it. More internet means less carefree attitude and more worrying about things.

Anyways, hopefully over time we'll get some new guys and gals on the forum from all over the world to share how metal developed in their countries.

‹‹ #13 ›› By IranPeaceThroughAnarchy on 28th May, 2021 @ 11:52 UTC -

1000% Agreed!

technology is nice, makes everything easier, but kills the creativity. the only good thing that the internet brought (at least for me) was the fact that we had access to all those great underground masterpieces from the 80s and 90s. other than that, a pointless creation!

\m/

‹‹ #3 ›› By HordalandImperator on 26th May, 2021 @ 11:50 UTC -
2%

Think I need to sort some shit out with links and youtube embeds in comments, make it easier to share things.

‹‹ #7 ›› By HordalandImperator on 27th May, 2021 @ 22:46 UTC -

Fixed, youtube embeds now work in comments too (for news & forum pages). And URLs are now automatically turned into clickable links properly, as long as they start with "http..."

‹‹ #9 ›› By IranPeaceThroughAnarchy on 27th May, 2021 @ 23:31 UTC -

That's a very useful feature actually. let's see how it'll be used by people :)

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